Gallatin Crest, Day 0 – Developing a Tolerance for Uncertainty

I’ve written about it before and will write about it again.

Having a high tolerance for uncertainty is a positive character trait and we should embrace every opportunity that comes our way, to practice our response to uncertainty.

Stephanie reminded me of the exciting opportunity to practice dealing with uncertainty tonight as we discovered, just hours ago, that our planned bikepacking trip into the Gallatin Mountains was planned in the no-bike zone known as the Hyalite-Porcupine-Buffalo Horn Wilderness Study Area. After talking to Crew Members, the alternative was obvious: maintain the plan, maintain the route, maintain the camp location – just change the mode of travel from bike to foot.

A simple solution that requires very little logistical adaptation.

However, sometimes these adaptations, regardless of how simple (or complex) the alternative options may be, can be mentally taxing – because they force a course change that you didn’t plan, and thus, you can’t enjoy all the control you used to enjoy!

As for me, I’m adapting. Tonight, I’m excited to wake up and lace up my trail shoes while wearing comfy hiking pants and real underwear instead of a chamois diaper (“Always look on the bright side of life…” – Spamalot).

I’m also eager to try out some new hiking gear that has just arrived in our review queue, including a new custom JepPak Ultralight Backpack.

Stay tuned as we adapt and enjoy the beautiful HPBH-WSA over the next few days!

We began developing a tolerance for uncertainty many years ago. This photo was taken the morning after a "perfect Montana weather forecast" was issued...Gallatin Mountains,  October 2003.
We began developing a tolerance for uncertainty many years ago. This photo was taken the morning after a “perfect Montana weather forecast” was issued…Gallatin Mountains, October 2003.